Mechanochemistry could provide a safer and greener route to anticancer drugs

The IMPACTIVE team has looked into the manufacturing of imatinib: an anticancer drug on the Essential Medicines’ list of the Worlds’ Health Organisation. Thanks to mechanochemistry, we discovered a synthetic route to do it in a way that is safer, greener and more efficient than the commercial method used nowadays.

Mechanochemistry: pioneering green synthesis solutions across industries

Mechanochemistry is a groundbreaking field, revolutionizing chemistry through force-triggered reactions, eco-friendly practices, and efficient processes. It’s a pioneer technology with applications across multiple fields: biomass transformation, energy storage, agrochemicals, and much more. With its versatility and sustainability, it’s reshaping a myriad of industries towards a greener, more innovative future. Keep reading to unveil different use-cases.

Who is behind IMPACTIVE? Discover our partners!

IMPACTIVE is a very ambitious project, with members of the greatest background diversity. Altogether, we want to get rid of the solvents in the current pharmaceutical processes and substitute them with mechanochemistry, a greener, more sustainable approach.

IMPACTIVE: mechanochemistry for greener pharmaceuticals

Have you ever thought about the environmental impact of the pills we take? We have, and we want to do something about it. From the different techniques we use, to the environmental analyses we perform, this article unravels all you need to know about IMPACTIVE.

Mechanochemistry 101: mashing molecules towards greener syntheses

Grinding stuff sounds simple. In fact, it’s oddly one of the oldest ways to carry out chemical reactions. And, although solvent-based chemistry still dominates the industry, mechanochemistry –transformations enabled by mechanical force– experiences a new surge, an exciting era of rediscovery. Inspired by the 12 principles of green chemistry, mechanochemistry could really reshape chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Read on to discover how mechanochemistry could catalyse cleaner and greener synthetic solutions.